What is Post Nasal Drip?

Post Nasal Drip TreatmentIn an abbreviated form, Post Nasal Drip is also called PND. Post Nasal Drip is a condition where the nasal mucosa (mucous lining in the nasal cavity) releases access mucous, which if not expelled accumulates in the back of the nose or throat. The presence of mucus in abundance causes a feeling of dripping down the back of the throat, congestion in the throat, itching of the throat, coughing, and a constant need to clear the throat.

Nasal mucosa releases mucus to keep nasal cavities moist to trap foreign particles like dust, pollen and any other foreign matter. When foreign particles are not filtered through the nose and enters into the respiratory system they can cause severe respiratory problems. Mucus assists in combating such respiratory problems but when excess nasal mucosa is released it is called Post Nasal Drip or Upper Airway Cough Syndrome.

The accumulation of mucus in the back of the throat and nose may also cause swelling and bleeding in the nose (nasal cavity). A person suffering from Post Nasal Drip often feels the need to drain the excess mucus, which feels like they have a cold, but in fact, this is not cold.

Symptoms of Post Nasal Drip may include the following:

  • Excessive Coughing
  • A constant need to clear one’s throat
  • Halitosis (bad breath)
  • An excessively sore throat that is not caused by a cold
  • Nausea or vomiting

If Post Nasal Drip is left untreated, it could lead to other more serious conditions such as an ear infection or bronchitis.

A Person suffering from Post Nasal Drip may also complain about having Halitosis (bad breath) due to mucus being high in protein. Bad breath can be easily treated if it is caused by Post Nasal Drip. By controlling mucus production, bad breath is eliminated.

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Nasal Mucus removal in children.

Nasal Aspirators

Adults have a variety of medication/remedy for their nasal congestion, but how should children relieve their nasal congestion? One of the most effective ways of removing children’s nasal mucous safely is to use a clear plastic tip Nasal aspirator.

The following items that are needed before removing nasal mucous from a child’s nose.

Have a tissue ready and if the baby has dry mucous you and you may also need to apply 2 or 3 drops of saline solution in each of the baby’s nostril. You can also make your own saline solution by using a half teaspoon of salt and dissolve it into one cup of boiled water, which has been left to cool.

Steps to follow when using a Nasal Aspirator:

  • Wrap the baby with a blanket or towel tightly
  • It will be safe to sit on the floor with the baby in between the legs
  • Talk to the baby in a calm voice in order to keep them from shaking their heads
  • With a smile, show the baby the nasal aspirator and explain how it’s going to help take out what is in the nose
  • Drop 2 to three drops of saline into the nostril
  • While, singing or humming squeeze the nasal aspirator bulb three times and release it and wipe with a tissue
  • Repeat these steps on the other nostrils until the nose in clean.

View our natural homeopathic treatments for sinus condition that can be used by children and adults alike.

How Smoking affects your Sinuses?

Have you even wondered what smoking does to your sinuses, you don’t have to look far… just look at the filter at the end of the cigarette. This filter is covered in black or brown gunk which provides a clear indication of what’s happening to a person’s lungs and sinuses.

The lining of the nose and sinuses is the same as the lining in the lung which has cilia (tiny hair-like structures), that clean the nose, sinuses, and lungs of airborne particulate matter, bacteria and mucous. When one smokes the cilia lining the nose, sinuses and lungs stop working which predisposes the smoker to increased infections of the lungs and sinuses.

Normally, all that mucus travels to the back of your throat and you swallow it. When the cilia are damaged and stop moving the mucus out, it backs up in the sinuses and bacteria start to multiply there.

The weaker the sinuses become, the greater the impact it will have on a person. The sinuses become more congested and more blocked due to the mucus membranes becoming irritated and inflamed causing more build up of mucous. This can then lead to a sinus infection with pain, headache, pressure, congestion, a runny nose, difficulty breathing and a reduced sense of smell.

Exposure to a secondhand smoke appears to be one of the factors that predispose you to Chronic Sinusitis with more people diagnosed with it after being exposed to secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke can have the same affect on your nose, sinuses, and lungs as it does on a primary smoke and has been linked to snoring, respiratory infections, and ear infections in children. Smoking is not just bad for your health, but also for people living around you.